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Entries in Hemi (6)

Wednesday
Jul162014

Challenger SRT Hellcat

Its a cool video, and a run between an old school Hemi with a 4 speed and 4.10 gears, against the Hellcat with 707 HP and an 8 speed automatic. See who wins...

 

Tuesday
Jul152014

Chrysler New Yorker

Fascinating story, its an original Hemi with dual quads...enjoy

 

Saturday
Jun212014

Road Kill - 55 Chevy / Hemi

Interesting episode of Road Kill...enjoy

 

 

Saturday
Nov102012

Hemi in a 55 Chevy

Another episode of Road Kill...enjoy

 

Monday
Sep172012

Engine Stories

Cadillac 331 ci.in.At one time cars had their specific engines, especially GM makes. Today all cars have generic manufacturer engines which are installed in all the different makes.

To get a feel for the time when GM cars had their specific engines, we have The Colonel this morning with us, we will ask him to join the conversation.

Q- Colonel Good Morning thank you for joining us, and sharing your perspectives. 

A- Guys...as usual great to be here, and engage in a conversation with you.

Q- At one time Cadillacs had Cadillac engines, Buick had Buick engines and so on. 

A- Lets start that Fords and Chrysler had the same engines for all the makes. A Ford engine would make its way in a Ford, a Mercury, or a Lincoln, although the displacement would be different, and the identifications on the engine (usually the valve covers) would indicate the make of the car. A Hemi made its way into Dodges, Plymouth, Chrysler, De Soto, Imperial as an example. Yes GM had specific engines. 

Q- Cadillac had Cadillac engines...

A- Yes, a Cadillac had a Cadillac engine not available in any of the other GM brands, and so on. Not only engines, even transmissions...Cadillac and Oldsmobile had Hydra Matics, Buick had Dynaflow, Chevrolet had Powerglides. 

Q- The early days of automatic transmissions they were branded. 

A- It was a big thing...the transmissions were branded with names, Hydra Matic, Torque Flite, Dynaflow, Powerglide, and so on...

Q- The more expensive the car, the better the engine?

A- That was the marketing message for having specific engines, and yes it was assumed that a Cadillac engine, was a better engine than a Chevrolet.

Q- The early days of hot rodding / performance were based on engines from expensive cars.

A- Sort of...the Ford Flathead since it was readily available was the hot rodding work horse, then it was Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, and Hemis...we are talking the early days of hot rodding in the early 1950's.

Q- Why was that?

A- Those engines usually had more and better metal where it counted.

Q- You mean better crankshafts, and connecting rods (forged), more metal around the cylinder bores, and so on.

A- Precisely...big, robust, motors that could endure some high performance use.

Q- How about configuration and displacement.

A- They were all V8's...lesser cars has inline 6 cylinders. As for displacement, the early Cadillac V8's were 331 cubic inches, big for the time, small for later years, and big by today's standards.

Q- For hot rodding...where did these engines come from?

A- Where do you think...scrap yards, accidented cars, 

Q- The cars with these engines were not as widespread as lets say a Chevrolet with and inline 6.

A- Yes...one probably had to do an amount of scrounging various junk yards, and put out the word, and perhaps even an amount to secure an engine at some point and time. Not as easy as ordering a crate engine today.